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MCP EICAS +2 EFIS Availability

Started by JG, Fri, 9 Feb 2024 22:37

JG

Good Morning Alex,

Thanks for replying. Yes they are the pre built modules. I have attempted to use Nick's OCMSetup program and carefully read the associated instructions. Running the setup program within PSXCockpit that is copied into the SIOC folder as in the instructions yields, "Failed to create C:\Program Files(x86)\IOCards\SIOC\PSXocm.lst".
If I open PSXCockpit OCMSetup when PSX Cockpit is pasted on my desktop it creates the PSXocm.lst and SIOC.ini files on the desktop but they are empty.
I'm using the latest SIOC from OC (V8 beta 2).....maybe that's the problem. Also PSXSeecon isn't running, the program starts but reports trouble with the not seeing SIOC variable, It is also not seeing PSX but this might resolve itself when there is actually some SIOC variables for it to see. Any help you could offer would be appreciated, my email <jg.galbak@gmail.com>. I'm only getting crickets from Open Cockpits after the time shift delay of a day!
I'm hearing you about the panels.....there just isn't anything out there to build an accurate cockpit! Even with money to spend there is nothing available.
Cheers, John.

asboyd

OK I see your problem....
Uninstall SIOC.
reinstall to a different directory (I use c:\SIOC).
The reason being windows will not allow files to be changed/saved in the default directory as they are "owned" by the "system".... (What a pain)

Once you reinstall try the OCMsetup again.

Cheers,
AlexB
Alex Boyd... Sydney, Australia

JG

Good Morning Alex, again thanks for your time.
The following is for the benefit of readers maybe having the same issues. I did get these going yesterday in the program files location after another waste of 3 hours! Hoorah!
In the only instructions I could find for SIOC (which was written for V3 and provided by an asked for link by Open Cockpits) the file path to SIOC was always shown as going through the program file path! When reading Nick's manual for PSXSeecon, I noted his comment about "To prevent UAC problems, install PSXSeecon outside of the C:\Program Files structure". I had no idea what UAC stood for and looked it up to find it was a term dealing with account ownership. So I guess from Alex's information, this applies to SIOC as well. At the moment PSXSeecon runs from the desktop, and did come to life when I eventually put variables where they needed to be in SIOC. I got the system running at the SIOC recommended file location by carefully mimicking Nicks information about "what goes on under the hood" in the PSX cockpit setup PDF and manually putting the files where they needed to be in SIOC and editing them accordingly. It would be really handy if a SIOC manual existed mentioning correct file paths with updated screen shots because the V8 GUI is completely different to the V3 one! This is all running on my test bed on the bench, so when I install it in the sim, I'll do as Alex instructed and I'm sure all will be well.
The shortage of the 4 contact closures in the EFIS units will be addressed with hardware modification and interfaced with Simstack since that is what will run my EICAS and MCP.
Because no official support exists at Open Cockpits for PSX and the Aerowinx site no longer links to bridging software for SIOC, I have mentioned to Open Cockpits that it would be advisable to remove their reference to PSX in its plug and play product advertising. They really are stretching the reliance of kind individuals to supply support while they make money out of it. It was only due to the complete lack of options I elected to try out the unsupported and I might add very good software. Thank you again Nick and Alex for your kindness.
Cheers J.G.

QuadFan

#23
Hi guys,

Good information here, and yes, I see and feel the frustration of not being able to buy 747 sim products that are plug 'n play. I attended FSWeekend and it was all kinda 737 and A320 stuff regarding cockpit building. Very annoying if you're not going for such an environment. CPFlight once again mentioned they 'need to follow the market'... :(. I did however talk to Bram at the 737diysim stand, which was very nice (see https://www.737diysim.com). I think I'm going to invest in a 3D printer and build my own CDU based on their 737 one. Not any time soon though.

I also talked to Michael from Mickey's Flightdeck. Based on his information I think I'm not going the route of building everything myself. It's just a very big investment in tools and equipment and I don't fancy selling more than my own panels because of 'customers' you know :)

Last weekend I was looking at the overhead panels from Hispapanels and Opencockpits. Going that route isn't exactly cheap either, with the Korry switches being €18,40 excluding vat a piece. I did buy 4 cards from OC (USB, master, input & output) and they are working directly using SIOCmon. Now comes the programming and interfacing part... I'd also like to thank Alex for his help so far, greatly appreciated!

It's also nice to read about your experience with the OC panels, JG. Good to know that the MCP and EICAS panels are good. JG, you might want to have a look at this video from Hispapanels: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5D050kr05gE - they adapt Rafi 19H switches in a cool way (I think :) ).

Cheers!

Seb
Seb

Gary Oliver

Seb,

Have you spoken to Peter at FDS?  www.flightdecksolutions.com

I know they did do an MCP/EFIS and CDU at a reasonable price and good quality.  In fact I have a development sample sat on my desk as I wrote the PSX driver for it.

If its not on their website and you are serious about purchasing it might be worth dropping Peter an email.

Cheers
Gary

Roddez

Gary,

Unfortunately FDS have changed their business model and now only build complete solutions for enterprise customers.  We recently spoke with Peter who confirmed this.   :(

Cheers,

Rod.
Rodney Redwin
YSSY
www.simulatorsolutions.com.au

garys

Seems like a perfect oppurtunity for you guys to take over from FDS and Aerosoft.  :)

QuadFan

Thanks for the suggestion Gary, I am in contact with Peter. I heard earlier that they don't sell components separately, so I was wondering what the possibilities are at the moment. No definitive answer yet.

I'm still surprised there's so little hardware for 747 freaks out there. Hispapanels offer components for the 787, which (I think)  has less admirers in the cockpit building community. I might be wrong though, as I'm biased :D
Seb

asboyd

There are more 737 and Airbus builders than 747 as the 737 is less complex (2 engines and easier to build THQ) and airbus can use a joystick (sidestick) so a lot of gamers already have hardware to fly them.

Most of the 747 simmers I know have tried to use real parts form scrapped aircraft..... Great if you have the money!
Some of us just keep using whatever we can to build parts. I am using Hardy's screen graphics to build my panels so they match PSX exactly (if they are not exactly like the "real" aircraft they will interface with PSX exactly) so I build when I can afford to and use bits and pieces salvaged from roadside clean ups. (My yoke columns are from an old bedhead....still working out the best way to make yoke handles.... may shape something in either clay or timber, make a silicon mold, and use resin.

My twopence worth  ;D
AlexB
Alex Boyd... Sydney, Australia

QuadFan

I always had the idea that the 737 was more popular due to the manual interaction required to operate the plane (which contradicts that the A320 is popular, I see that :) ), but you have a point.

I've been browsing ebay a bit (mostly to do some research about dimensions and knob types), but using real hardware is not an option for me just yet. I suspect there will be multiple iterations of my cockpit and for now, I'm leaning towards building and interfacing my own stuff using bought panels. Creating them myself is to next-level for me and I won't be enjoying the learning process  ;D
Building the MIP housing is another story, that I'll dive into and I intend to share everything I make on github, maybe others may benefit from it (or tell me what I should've done better, lol).

I do intend to keep everything as close to PSX as possible, with as less extra software as possible. We'll see.

Thanks for the AUD 0,02 Alex!  8)
Seb

JG

G'day Seb, Alex and anyone else following.
Let me start by saying that PSX is so good you don't need a full cockpit layout to enjoy it and the fact it can be used with a laptop or interfaced into an actual flight deck is testimony to how much thought and intelligence has been applied to its implementation! Then there is the overwhelming generosity of those who over so many years have created add on software to enhance what is already a spectacular piece of work. For my part, being new on the scene like Seb, and in keeping with the sharing spirit of the PSX community, I can only offer my insights into the experience so far of building a PSX based cockpit, a dream held since first seeing it in Beta version and only now being realised due to having the time after retirement.
There are many reasons why decisions are made about the correct approach to a build depending on individual case finance, space, power and time availability. For many like me, it'll be a combination of all 4.
Alex, I agree the price asked for replica components is exorbitant, but too understand there are tooling costs and market pressures that drive price and availability. 747 builders are always going to struggle for these reasons. So into the sharing bit. An example of improvisation to cater for the constraints applied by practicality. To build the tillers for my sim I needed a self centering potentiometer arrangement mimicking the look in the actual cockpit. The solution was a door handle that by virtue is self centering, with the needed bits added to make it functional and appear as it should. There are many examples like this in my sim. Yokes are cut down trust master Boeing edition, mechanically not connected but electronically they work absolutely as they should, conflict between the two yokes as in real life is sorted out by the Capt and FO communicating. They look almost like the real thing, cost many thousands less and offer many extra controls utilised to work scenery monitor layout and sim features like pause and motion hold. The TQ is cut down Honeycomb Bravo. I modified the reverser switches to make a pulse at each movement instead of being on for reverse and off for forward. The Thrustmaster rudder pedals move back and forth for different pilots electrically using industrial automatic door actuators. Easier to build that than the winding mechanical business in the real aircraft. Seats and "J" rails done for a few hundred dollars instead of 8000 euro before tax and freight to buy off the shelf replicas! The list of these improvisations is endless....and I've only been building less than a year. Too much time on my hands I guess.
My overhead panel will remain touch screens, as will my pedestal....it works very well for things that don't require changing in a big hurry or are simple push buttons. I have no problem operating the touch screen representation of the CDU's. I'm going tactile for MCP and EFIS because you need quick changes and touch screens for rotating controls are fiddly. Because of the layout this means a tactile lower EICAS control panel too, but only for looks.
My interface of choice is Simstack because of the spectacular support offered and the fact it uses readily available electronics hardware. It is incredibly flexible supporting all forms of active high or low, PWM and changeable voltage inputs to feed outputs of differing needs. It is designed to work with PSX and so uses the same variable set and integer values making the only required bridging software Simstack Switch which protects the PSX server and filters the variable stream to each Simstack client to those only required by that Simstack. This removes the need for big serial buffers and greatly reduces network traffic. I would say that Simstack can interface any piece of hardware to PSX regardless of whether or not it is OEM or replica. No, I'm not a Simstack expert, or a programming genius, but I do know a thing or two about electronics. The guys at Sim Solutions do programming for those like me who find it a black art! Though after a relatively short time of self teaching I think I have a pretty good idea of how the programming works, so please don't be put off by programming complexity, it really isn't especially if you already have knowledge of C or C++ which I don't.
You have seen my previous posts about parts and module availability. Open Cockpits offers solid solutions to many 747 builder problems. If you're using modules, do your research into software interfaces very carefully. Hispapanels too have some good stuff. Two others, that have some hard to come by goodies are simparts.de, these guys do a great range of pot and encoder covers. Propwash Simulations in the US also have some hard to find bits. Unfortunately, being in Australia makes purchases from a lot of international suppliers nonviable due to freight and tax costs......So out comes the 3D printer.
Another of the problems faced is concentric controls, stacked rotary encoder/switch combinations can be bought off the shelf. Knobs and covers for these can be difficult. The one you just can't get anywhere.... rotary switch/encoder-switch combinations, like that of bank/heading/select on the MCP as well as Baro/Mode/Standard and Minimums/Mode/Reset of the EFIS. I've seen all manner of complicated mechanical solutions using gears and discrete components. It is far simpler to keep it axial if rearward space is available. The cheap 12 position rotary switches readily available have an indexing plate to make them any number of positions you need up to 12. They can also be easily dismantled and the shaft drilled with a 3mm bore to take a central rod for connection to an encoder/switch mounted behind it. You really need a small lathe to do this, but there is a video floating about on You Tube showing this managed with a drill press.
So having diverged from the original theme of the post, if anyone wants more info on what I've done I'm happy to share it. Just add a post.
Cheers, J.G.

b744erf

Hello my friends

I'm delighted to know that there are more new members joining the PSX family. This year marks my tenth year since I purchased my PSX. The joy and excitement I felt when I opened the package containing the PSX discs shipped from Europe in 2014 are still fresh in my memory. Over these ten years, I've transitioned from being a laptop player to a Sim builder, and now I've finally built my dream cockpit entirely using OEM parts. PSX has truly fulfilled my childhood dream.

All the components I currently use are OEM, primarily utilizing Simstack and SIOC drivers. Simstack is mainly employed for powering high-power components like backlighting for all panels. Meanwhile, SIOC drives the open cockpit's I/O board for almost all Input-Output functions, including automatic throttle and spoiler motor control. Some may wonder how SIOC can drive high-power incandescent lamps at 28V. In reality, I utilize the output signal of the Open Cockpit board to drive an external PLC driver board, thus achieving low-power output driving high-power output. Additionally, the PWM signal output from the Open Cockpit motor board can also drive high-power backlighting with an external MOS board. Therefore, SIOC is nearly universal. I must express my gratitude to PSXSeecon for connecting SIOC with PSX, enabling me to drive OEM components at low cost.

I hope more friends can join the PSX family, and I especially hope to see more 747 Simulator builders come together to realize their dreams.

Regards
Jack

asboyd

Hi Guys,
I just want to say I was not having a shot at the cost of simulation panels, just the original aircraft panels.
As far as Sim panels go I was buying from Opencockpit until the cost of shipping went through the roof.

For example a circuit kit which cost 12 Euros to buy, cost 40+ Euros to ship to Australia. Most of the shipping rates went up rapidly when Covid hit and due to other world events have never come back down.

(I was even thinking of a trip to Europe with an empty suitcase to buy parts and bring them back with me  ;) ).

I have been a flight simmer since Microsoft released Flight Simulator for PC (old wireframe graphics) and even had a copy for my old Commodore 64.....

The reason I am building a cockpit is due to me being fascinated with electronics (38 years in ICT as well) and I love to build things...

I am sure there are many simmers that do not build cockpits and I have been one for many years.
I just like to challenge myself.

It is great to be part of a sim community where everyone is so helpful and supportive. I try to play my part and will help out were I can..

Cheers,
AlexB
Alex Boyd... Sydney, Australia

QuadFan

Hi guys,

Quote from: JG on Sat,  6 Apr 2024 04:03There are many reasons why decisions are made about the correct approach to a build depending on individual case finance, space, power and time availability. For many like me, it'll be a combination of all 4.

Exactly, it'll be more iterations along the way. Thanks for the insight about your choices and described alternatives, it confirms that I'm not the only one making these choices (which I knew, of course, but it's nice to read about other simmers' thoughts) :)

Quote from: JG on Sat,  6 Apr 2024 04:03My overhead panel will remain touch screens, as will my pedestal....it works very well for things that don't require changing in a big hurry or are simple push buttons. I have no problem operating the touch screen representation of the CDU's. I'm going tactile for MCP and EFIS because you need quick changes and touch screens for rotating controls are fiddly. Because of the layout this means a tactile lower EICAS control panel too, but only for looks.

I think I'll focus on the EFIS/MCP/EICAS first too, since I want those to be tactile too. I might through in a radio and ATC module once I find the nerve to fly on VATSIM again.

Quote from: JG on Sat,  6 Apr 2024 04:03There are many examples like this in my sim. Yokes are cut down trust master Boeing edition, mechanically not connected but electronically they work absolutely as they should, conflict between the two yokes as in real life is sorted out by the Capt and FO communicating. They look almost like the real thing, cost many thousands less and offer many extra controls utilised to work scenery monitor layout and sim features like pause and motion hold. The TQ is cut down Honeycomb Bravo. I modified the reverser switches to make a pulse at each movement instead of being on for reverse and off for forward.

@JG what exactly do you mean by 'cut down'? Curious about both the yokes and Honeycomb Bravo changes.

Quote from: JG on Sat,  6 Apr 2024 04:03Another of the problems faced is concentric controls, stacked rotary encoder/switch combinations can be bought off the shelf. Knobs and covers for these can be difficult. The one you just can't get anywhere.... rotary switch/encoder-switch combinations, like that of bank/heading/select on the MCP as well as Baro/Mode/Standard and Minimums/Mode/Reset of the EFIS. I've seen all manner of complicated mechanical solutions using gears and discrete components. It is far simpler to keep it axial if rearward space is available.

You're right about this. I figured I would go with the pre-built EFIS modules from OC for the time being, using the SIOC software and PSXseecon to interface them and start using them while building the MCP and EICAS, also interfacing those with the same software.

@Alex and @JG, would you consider the prebuilt EFIS a good enough starting point for use as a tactile device, improving it along the way?

@JG, I'm considering buying the MCP and EICAS panels from OC. You stated you were happy with the quality, I was wondering how many panels you got for each. E.g. are there more panels besides the faceplates, so you can mount switches, displays and encoders to it with the appropriate distance (auxiliary panels)?
Have you ordered the Korry switches for the MCP too?

Quote from: b744erf on Sat,  6 Apr 2024 05:49The joy and excitement I felt when I opened the package containing the PSX discs shipped from Europe in 2014 are still fresh in my memory.

I wish products were still sold like this, adds to the feeling, doesn't it :)

Quote from: asboyd on Sun,  7 Apr 2024 04:48It is great to be part of a sim community where everyone is so helpful and supportive. I try to play my part and will help out were I can..

I really love this community, this forum is quite the source of information and it has been great to exchange information (although I haven't been able to provide a lot back (yet) ;) ).
@Alex, your help is greatly appreciated, it really helped me set a direction for my build  8)

Cheers!
Seb

asboyd

Seb,
You are most welcome.
I had a fair bit of help from others in this forum since I joined several years ago, so paying it forward always works :)

When I build my panels I use two or three "layers" usually 3mm acrylic. One layer holds the switches, buttons and displays. The top layer (usually white with layers of engraved paint) are for visuals and may have display surrounds attached.
I have some pictures here of an RCP in progress: https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/kl99t7pt3utr2ftuup9fj/RCP-Photos.zip?rlkey=kqdunhnyzyq2hcuo2o8ulite4&dl=0

Cheers,
AlexB
Alex Boyd... Sydney, Australia

JG

Hi Seb,
The Honeycomb Bravo and Thrustmaster yokes come with a big ugly desk clamp fitted to them. By cut down I mean exactly that. I dismantled them and carefully removed the unwanted bits in a manner that makes them fit permanently into my setup. So the TQ has the trim wheel removed, the clamp body is gone along with the switch gangs, gear lever and other controls not used in that area of the sim. All the PCB's are included behind the scenes and all the contact closures that were there are still available should they be needed later. I have used some of these to provide FO side A/T disable and TOGA switches. There are 2 contact closures available on throttle 1 ( 1 TOGA and 1 reverser) and a single closure on the other 3 levers for the reversers. As stated, I altered the closure of the #2 reverser to be compatible with PSX. Reverser contacts 1,3 & 4 are unused and at a later time I intend to used these to emulate the lever mounted TOGA and A/T switches. The spread of the throttle levers is pretty good using an aftermarket knob set. The spoiler and flap levers are set to close to the thrust levers but I don't really notice the difference. The aftermarket knob set has a notch plate for the flap lever. The extra space at the outboard sides of the TQ has been used for a couple of mouse pads to control the radio frequency knobs that are a fiddle using the touch screen. These will eventually have a couple of concentric rotary encoders mounted in the same area. The lower section of the TQ is also featured on the top of the pedestal touch screen for control of the cut-off switches and the portrait mode it runs in allows the layout to include an additional representation of the TQ at the very back to check operation of the hardware and see the trim gauges.
The yokes have had the same treatment. They don't go all the way to the floor since they are designed to mount to a desk top. So they are mounted an appropriate height off the floor on a structure coming from the bulkhead between the rudder pedals. The movement of the wheel approximates the movement of the yokes reasonably well considering the vast difference between a desk mounted and a floor mounted yoke....but the price difference is in the thousands. You also get lots of nice switches you don't have on the real yoke too. I use these to do the usual functions like PTT, Stab and rudder trims but also use the extras for sim functions like pause and motion hold and changing the windscreen view from full horizon to spit for landing and takeoff (Captain side correct POV and FO side correct POV). The captain yoke is connected to the server and the FO side connected to a different machine running a client. Hardy's brilliant network engineering takes care of the rest. The hall effect pickup of these yokes gives a very smooth and precise output and there is a couple of unused resistive axis's available on each yoke....I've used these for Capt and FO tillers. More could be done with the switches if I could figure out a way to activate some of them onto MSFS at the same time. MSFS runs my scenery for pretty pictures, but because of its total unreliability, instability, long winded booting and general inaccuracies, I am set up to switch over to the PSX windscreen with the push of a button so I don't have to end a flight because MSFS has a brain fart!
The OC MPC panel comes with two acrylic plates 3mm thick. The paint, engraving and cutting is a quality effort. The engraving doesn't precisely match the real thing but it's very close. As I have been building my MCP I have added another layer of acrylic in places to get switch depth correct. I did buy OC's Korry's. At 18 euro they are pricy for Aussies, but they do get engraved and with whatever backlight colour you want, so in my opinion worth the money. My only criticism for the Korry's is that the engraving isn't visible unless the backlights are on....since you're not actually in the air, I fail to get too animated about that though. If you're building an MCP a handy observation is that it is equipment rack width, so you can buy an off the self rack box to save building a chassis from scratch. There is nothing else in the MCP kit from OC's.
The EICAS control panel from OC's also has two acrylic plates and includes the switch buttons for both plates. I was able to get a good result just using vero board to mount the actual switches and backlight LEDS.
The EFIS panel modules from OC's have the following shortcomings. The front panel is not the full height it should be....about 6mm short. It is jammed into a box that squashes the board layer ribbon connecting cables to the point where they will probably eventually short together. There is no TFC, CTR, baro mode or minimums mode switches. You can fiddle with the programming to put CTR under the minimums reset if you think it'll help. The back lights are a weird colour. I am going to dismantle mine and fix all these problems, but only because I already have them. If I was starting again, I would go with panel kits....I think Hispapanels do them with switches and mechanicals in the kit. OC's do just the panels too, but I reckon they would be 6mm too short as well. As far as your electronics backbone goes, I'd choose one and stick with it. I've gone with Simstack and I will give all my OC stuff that backbone. I like Simstack for all the reasons previously mentioned, but additionally it has program features in the background that utilise all the power distribution emulation Hardy has faithfully reproduced in PSX. Then there is the audio solution Simstack can provide which is just spectacular. Please mail Rod at Sim Solutions for info on this as information release may have proprietary information implications.
Hope I've covered all your questions Seb.
Cheers, J.G.

QuadFan

Hi JG,

QuoteMore could be done with the switches if I could figure out a way to activate some of them onto MSFS at the same time.

Ah, maybe you could use spad.next for this? I suppose you could just leave al the other knobs alone in spad.next, but use the ones you need to send commands to MSFS.

QuoteI am set up to switch over to the PSX windscreen with the push of a button so I don't have to end a flight because MSFS has a brain fart!

Could you give a hint about how you did this? MSFS crashes now and then and I dislike ending the flight because of it, but the PSX exernal visuals are nice in that case (e.g. much better than nothing).

QuoteThe OC MPC panel comes with two acrylic plates 3mm thick. The paint, engraving and cutting is a quality effort. The engraving doesn't precisely match the real thing but it's very close. As I have been building my MCP I have added another layer of acrylic in places to get switch depth correct. I did buy OC's Korry's. At 18 euro they are pricy for Aussies, but they do get engraved and with whatever backlight colour you want, so in my opinion worth the money. My only criticism for the Korry's is that the engraving isn't visible unless the backlights are on....since you're not actually in the air, I fail to get too animated about that though. If you're building an MCP a handy observation is that it is equipment rack width, so you can buy an off the self rack box to save building a chassis from scratch. There is nothing else in the MCP kit from OC's.

Thanks for this! I just ordered a MCP panel and some buttons, and one Korry switch to see if I like the quality enough to buy them all; I hate to think about the overhead, with all its Korry switches :)

QuoteThe EFIS panel modules from OC's have the following shortcomings. The front panel is not the full height it should be....about 6mm short.
...
I think Hispapanels do them with switches and mechanicals in the kit. OC's do just the panels too, but I reckon they would be 6mm too short as well.

Thanks for this, too. I think I'm going to focus on the MCP for now, I still haven't decided on what route to take for the EFISes.
I might have a go at this: https://www.737diysim.com/build-guides-1/boeing-737-3d-printed-efis-v6
All in all, I'm considering buying a 3D printer. Might be a good investment if I could print my own Korries. The business case is kind of easy :)

QuoteAs far as your electronics backbone goes, I'd choose one and stick with it. I've gone with Simstack and I will give all my OC stuff that backbone. I like Simstack for all the reasons previously mentioned, but additionally it has program features in the background that utilise all the power distribution emulation Hardy has faithfully reproduced in PSX. Then there is the audio solution Simstack can provide which is just spectacular.

Sound advice, I've been mailing with Alex about this too. Simstack looks like a good solution, I have the same (but opposite) problem of you though: postage from the other side of the world, customs charges etc. :)

For now I'm going with the OC I/O cards an trying it all out. After I've gotten PSXseecon to work I've made some nice progress, giving me enough confidence to start the MCP build.

Thanks for all the insight!

Cheers

Seb
Seb

asboyd

I tried to get OC to provide Korries with 747 labels and they refused saying they only had the files for 737 switches. Hence I made my own. The labels I use are B/W laser printed on three layers of transparent self adhesive film and one layer of white self adhesive paper. I print the "top" half of the label on the white self adhesive (providing the label you see prior to power up), I print 2 layers of the full label on film and then half of the bottom layer is printed completely black on film so the lower indicator is not visible until backlit.

It is very fiddly work but give a good visual effect. The labels are then applied to a thin sheet of clear acrylic which snap fits into place on my 3d printed Korries.

Once again allowing me to replicate the look and fell of Hardy's great display visuals.

Cheers,
AlexB
Alex Boyd... Sydney, Australia

funkyhut

When PMDG finally get round to their 747-400 on MSFS, maybe some of the depreciated manufacturers will come back to life?
Their 777 is about to drop, after which they say they'll move on to the 747 but who knows?
Greetings from the mountains of Northern Thailand (VTCC),
Chris Stanley.

QuadFan

Quote from: asboyd on Mon, 15 Apr 2024 22:47I tried to get OC to provide Korries with 747 labels and they refused saying they only had the files for 737 switches. Hence I made my own.

Nice... Seems weird to offer 747 panels that take korries when you can't get 747 style lenses. Oh well. Looks like you made a smart choice about it :)

Quote from: asboyd on Mon, 15 Apr 2024 22:47It is very fiddly work but give a good visual effect. The labels are then applied to a thin sheet of clear acrylic which snap fits into place on my 3d printed Korries.

Once again allowing me to replicate the look and fell of Hardy's great display visuals.

That would be my aim, too. Whenever I am in doubt, I fire up PSX and have a look :D
I hope I will be able to fit the 737diysim korries as they offer custom lenses too. If not, I might be making the business case for a 3D printer. At €18 euros a Korry it's an easy choice I guess, assuming I'll build an overhead too.

Quote from: funkyhut on Tue, 16 Apr 2024 10:08Their 777 is about to drop, after which they say they'll move on to the 747 but who knows?

I think the order in which PMDG release their products is an indication on how popular the 747 is nowadays :(

Cheers
Seb