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Problem with keystrokes

Started by acannata, Fri, 2 Sep 2016 16:23

acannata

Hi!

Since PSX installation on my laptop (Win 8.1), I experience a fastidious problem. In flight if I don't press any key for 1-2', when I press again a key a "Windows tone" is heard without any effect on PSX. After a second keypress finally I obtain the desired effect (eg stop motion) without "Windows tone".
Do you know how to fix the problem?
Thank you

Aldo

cavaricooper

Aldo-

It sounds like your PSX window is loosing focus.  When you press it once, it regains priority and the second push allows for actioning..... could this be happening?  Do you run PSX maximized?  Are there other programs asserting themselves?

HTH- C
Carl Avari-Cooper, KTPA

Hardy Heinlin

Hi Aldo,

is your keyboard battery powered?

Is there any energy saving mode active?


|-|ardy

Jeroen Hoppenbrouwers

As a diagnostic, try to move your mouse before the keystroke, and later click your mouse before the keystroke.

acannata

Thank you all for the prompt assistance even in the evening!
Changed energy mode from balanced to high performance: unsuccessful.
Following PSX start, I left open the window showing the files into the PSX folder.
By closing that window the problem seems to be solved. I created a shortcut on the desktop in order to start PSX without opening the folder.
By the way the problem involved also the cursor (need to click one time in order to activate the change of the cursor over knobs and buttons).

Cheers

Aldo

torrence

Things would be sooo much easier for those of us stuck in Microsoft-land if Windows 'upgrades' would just bloody well stop helping us so much!!.  Rant finished.

[Apple has quirks too of course - just different.  And I really admire the part of the community that is pushing ahead making PSX work with UNIX descendants.]

Cheers
Torrence

Cheers
Torrence

torrence

I.e.

Kudos to Hardy for fully embracing the platform independent (if somewhat quirky at times) Java for PSX.

Cheers,
Torrence
Cheers
Torrence

Phil Bunch

Quote from: Hardy Heinlin on Fri,  2 Sep 2016 16:38
Hi Aldo,

is your keyboard battery powered?

Is there any energy saving mode active?


|-|ardy

Along this line of thought, I had to go to a great deal of trouble in order to track down a somewhat hidden "energy saving" mode for my USB hub.  By default, without much if any evidence through ordinary Windows Energy Saving modes, the USB hub would go into energy saving mode without any notice other than an occasional "ding" noise in my PC speakers.  Only by thoroughly investigating and testing each component and each link in the component's electronic chain was I finally able to disable energy saving in my USB hub.

I hope my example is indirectly at least helpful to someone even if their USB hub is not the offending component.
Best wishes,

Phil Bunch

emerydc8

Thanks for the input, Phil.

QuoteOnly by thoroughly investigating and testing each component and each link in the component's electronic chain was I finally able to disable energy saving in my USB hub.

Is the energy-saving mode a part of Windows itself or is it in a separate program that was installed to use the USB hub? I don't have a USB hub (yet), but it would be good to know. Thanks.

Jon D.

Jeroen Hoppenbrouwers

Just as Ethernet hubs started out as dumb bit forwarders and ended as extremely powerful switches that know more about your network (and you) than you do, USB hubs have been upgrading themselves to complete peripheral managers. They can power their endpoint devices up and down depending on what they believe is going on. This may work perfectly fine for a regular desktop setup with mouse, keyboard, speakers, and a few other gimmicks, but typically won't do with the more arcane devices uses by simmers.

A powered but stupid USB hub often is preferred over a smart one.

Still better would be to abandon USB and go Ethernet all the way . . . we've some experience with that. In larger sim setups, a USB tree becomes a huge random failure generator. Not so much for keyboard and mouse but the I/O cards are better fed with Ethernet.


Hoppie