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10 most extreme airports - history channel DVD and TV show

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Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 944
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Best wishes,

Phil Bunch
Member
Registered: May 2010
Posts: 46
add another to the list..
VQPR, paro in bhutan,
I always find this airport interesting, not successful all the time in msfs, using a 738 of course.

http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeromagazine/aero_23/737-700Bhutan_story.html

of course ... the 319 won the bid :'(
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 944
rayngwt wrote
add another to the list..
VQPR, paro in bhutan,
I always find this airport interesting, not successful all the time in msfs, using a 738 of course.

http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeromagazine/aero_23/737-700Bhutan_story.html

of course ... the 319 won the bid :'(


From wikipedia:

"According to Travel & Leisure, only eight pilots in the world are certified to land at the airport."

Bhutan has some interesting airports and air travel options.

Since it has a 6500 foot runway, we could use it for 747-400s! A candidate for worldflight??? (grins)
_______________
Best wishes,

Phil Bunch
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 414
Location: Mumbai, India
Would be interested to learn about pilots being certified for various
airports. If I have a CPL, I cannot fly to just any airport I wish to?
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 149
I don't know how bad it is for a real pilot, but ksan is exciting even as a passenger in a small plane or in a sim. The field looks great from the ocean, out on the flat not far from the harbor. However prevailing winds are on-shore and most flights land from the East on the single Rwy 27. The approach is over Balboa park located in hilly terrain to the east of the airport and you have to stay above 1800 ft to the final approach fix on the crest of the last hill before the airport. At that point on a clear day you can wave to the dinners at Mr A's rooftop restaurant about half a mile off your starboard wing and dial down the V/S rapidly to match a 3.14 deg final glide slope. With a displaced threshold I think you have only about 9400 ft usable runway. With winds and big plane this can be fun.

Cheers,
Torrence
Member
Registered: May 2010
Posts: 46
:D
adventurous, keep the speed low, and bank hard, haha!
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 414
Location: Mumbai, India
Sorry to be a nuisance, but I'd really like to hear from a real-life pilot
about this 'pilots having to be certified to land at such-and-such airport' business.

Thanks,
Shiv

(Couldn't find anything about it with google)
Moderator
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 5140
Shiv Mathur wrote
If I have a CPL, I cannot fly to just any airport I wish to?

I'd say 99.9% of all land runways (don't know about water runways) can be used even with a PPL.

Some critical runways (steep slope, short length, high obstacles) may first require a few training patterns with an instructor, and in most cases the respective logbook entry will suffice as a certification.

The most famous approach requiring a special license was probably the IGS approach into Kai Tak. I don't know what kind of certification procedure they used and if it was airline specific or a government thing.


Cheers,

|-|ardy
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 958
Location: Chicago
The Grand Canyon SFAR 50-2 needed a check ride in order to fly within it... It's the only case of airspace I know that requires a special flight certification. The airport (KGCN) didn't need any special rules.
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Will /Chicago /USA
Moderator
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 5140
Ah ... Grand Canyon airport ... that was a great time back in 1994 :-) Four guys in an old C172 ... I did the takeoff in the evening and flew the leg back to Page (our camp) for a red-romantic approach in the dusk ...

User posted image

(I think my old scanner oversaturated the red soil a bit.)

|-|
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 958
Location: Chicago
Hardy, I was flying for Grand Canyon Airlines in 1994, so we were at KGCN at the same time. Interesting! Perhaps you used their refueling services. The Twin Otter is nothing like the 744, but I would have gladly shown you around if you'd been interested... Power levers on the ceiling, a wild arrangement!
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Will /Chicago /USA
Moderator
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 5140
Interesting, indeed :-) I knew (from forum posts) you were flying there, but didn't know it was in 1994.


|-|
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 958
Location: Chicago
I was there 1993-1995.
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Will /Chicago /USA
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 414
Location: Mumbai, India
Thanks Hardy and Will.
So I guess the 'only 8 pilots in the world certified to land at Paro' is merely
some journalistic spicing up.

Cheers,
Shiv
Moderator
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 2449
Location: KTMB
Possibly certified to land an A319 at Paro. That is something else.
Moderator
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 5140
For takeoff and landing at Paro you must always anticipate random Yeti attacks.
Moderator
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 5140
Quote
While Bhutan is the most extreme example—only eight pilots in the world are qualified to fly into Paro—


qualified = certified?
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 414
Location: Mumbai, India
Phil's post (#3 in this thread) says 'certified'.
Moderator
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 5140
Phil quotes Wikipedia ("certified") whose original source says "qualified".
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 414
Location: Mumbai, India
Ah yes ... well noticed.

But qualified or certified, it does seem to be an invented statistic.
Moderator
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 5140
Let's discuss the meaning of the word "qualified" :-)

(I think this word is more abstract than "certified".)

By the way, by this example you can also see how an original source gets more and more blurred by using synonyms when citing a quote of a cited quote ...
Member
Registered: Jun 2009
Posts: 25
Some airports or approaches require that the operator has approval from the relevant authorities. The authorities may require that the airlines has a special training program in place and special procedures defined e.g. for one engine inoperative flight. The airline then appoints pilots to fly to these destinations and if relevant or required may then give these pilots extra training in the simulator and possibly a check flight as well.

So if the authorities of Buthan requires operator approval to land in Paro, it may be that Drukair appointed 6 pilots (most likely captains) to land there at the time it was written and that Drukair is the only approved operator.

There are also airports where the operator may only fly special approaches if approved. Example is Salzburg in Austria, where a "Special ILS16" with a lower minimum exists. No special pilot training is required, but the operator needs approval. Other operators may fly the normal ILS without approval.

However, unless something is completely special for Buthan, non-scheduled operators does not require such approval.
Here is a example on youtube of a Falcon 900B business jet landing there.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WgwpI2aP_ho
If you have the patience the video is actually quite interesting, as one of the pilots talk the other one through how to fly the approach, and goes to to show how much local knowledge is required.
« Last edit by Tor on Tue, 31 Aug 2010 11:30:24 +0000. »
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 414
Location: Mumbai, India
Hardy Heinlin wrote
Let's discuss the meaning of the word "qualified" :-)

(I think this word is more abstract than "certified".)


Interesting. To me, in this particular context, 'qualified' means 'capable of',
and 'certified' means (to use Tor's neat phrase) 'has approval from the relevant
authorities'.

If we can accept this meaning for 'qualified', then the exact figure of 8 pilots
must have been picked out of a hat.

Cheers,
Shiv
Moderator
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 5140
Shiv Mathur wrote
To me, in this particular context, 'qualified' means 'capable of',
and 'certified' means (to use Tor's neat phrase) 'has approval from the relevant
authorities'.

To me, too.

You may be qualified -- with or without a certification.

You may be certified -- only if you're qualified.


Cheers,

|-|ardy
Member
Registered: May 2009
Posts: 958
Location: Chicago
Very correct; "qualified" means to have achieved some kind of standard. "Certified" means to have received an attestation of ability or state. It also means "having been committed to a mental institution." Just saying.
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Will /Chicago /USA

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