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Author Topic: Green liquid in cables  (Read 359 times)

Hardy Heinlin

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Green liquid in cables
« on: Fri, 15 May 2020 19:25 »
There are good cables and there are bad cables.

In the past years I noticed that some cables that are isolated with PVC start producing a green liquid after about 11 years.

At first I thought it's copper oxid. But it's not. It even appears on the outer skin of the PVC, in PVC scratches (from the knife), where there is no contact to the copper.

For example, I had an AKG headphone. About 11 years after the purchases that green liquid leaked from the cable connection at the head and from the plug.

A few months ago I bought two meters of heavy current cables for a good price. Now they produce that green liquid. If my assumption is correct, these cables must have been produced 11 years ago.

I assume this liquid is the chemical reaction of a plasticizer in the PVC, and this plasticizer is only useable for 11 years. When they developed this type of PVC mix, they probably didn't do any long term tests. I have never seen this problem in other cables in my whole life before 2010.

It's really a mess. One works with all these nice electric things for years, and suddenly they transform themselves into green liquid.

Has anyone else seen this green stuff?

I don't know what the rules are in other countries, but in Germany these plasticizers must not be included in toys etc.


Regards,

|-|ardy


Just found this:
https://www.whyprysmian.co.uk/news-green-goo.html
https://youtu.be/dQfLXHweDv0?t=128
« Last edit: Fri, 15 May 2020 19:44 by Hardy Heinlin »

jcomm

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Hardy Heinlin

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Re: Green liquid in cables
« Reply #2 on: Fri, 15 May 2020 22:24 »
What I wonder about is the 11 year period - if it's not coincidence.

Some years ago I had a cabinet on four small wheels with solid PVC tires (not from Ikea). 11 years after the purchase the PVC suddenly became liquid and the tires broke apart.