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News: Precision Simulator update 10.91 (14 October 2019) is now available

Author Topic: What headsets do you prefer to wear when flying?  (Read 828 times)

John H Watson

  • Join date: May 2010
  • Location: On a pedestal
  • Posts: 2006
Re: What headsets do you prefer to wear when flying?
« Reply #20 on: Mon, 20 May 2019 03:02 »
We call these mic audio processing circuits "Compressor/VOX" circuits. On the 767 interphone system, any mic input below 40mV will not be passed.

Once a decent mic signal is received, you can then hear background noise in your headset. As an engineer, I didn't like not hearing anything if I keyed the microphone and heard nothing (prior to speaking).

Quote from: Jon
Some of our 767s have the control column locking mechanism.

Ah.. thanks.

turbodiddley

  • Join date: Jan 2019
  • Posts: 23
Re: What headsets do you prefer to wear when flying?
« Reply #21 on: Mon, 20 May 2019 17:11 »
Flying with Hillbilly Hotmike is pretty much standard now. Use a rubber band on the comm panel to hold the switch in the INT position. Much safer to hear your other crew members clearly, and to have both earpieces on the ear to clearly hear ATC. This gives maximum passive noise suppression by having the earpieces on the ears, and if you have active noise suppression, then that is maximized as well.

The -8F and other more modern Boeing jets come from the factory with a locking hot mike switch on the yoke.

Shouting over the noise of the jet is becoming a thing of the past.

This was standard in the military, but only has been creeping into the industry for the last 10 years or so. Interesting that it took so long to take hold. I think it was with the advent of noise cancelling headsets that people started rethinking it.

John H Watson

  • Join date: May 2010
  • Location: On a pedestal
  • Posts: 2006
Re: What headsets do you prefer to wear when flying?
« Reply #22 on: Mon, 20 May 2019 23:59 »
Quote
Flying with Hillbilly Hotmike is pretty much standard now.

Note that doing this will mute (or reduce the volume of) one or both speakers. As mentioned, if you're flying with a 3rd pilot who is not wearing a headset, he/she may not be in the loop.

On the Classic 747, the aural warnings came through the regular speakers, but (fortunately) I think most of the aural warnings were unmuted. The Radio Altimeter DH tone was the exception.