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News: The latest PSX update (version 10.49 from 15 October 2018) is available at: http://aerowinx.com/board/index.php?topic=4191.0

Author Topic: New Rudder Pedals  (Read 289 times)

emerydc8

  • Join date: Jun 2015
  • Location: Tucson, AZ USA
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New Rudder Pedals
« on: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 05:47 »
Has anyone had any experience with this brand? The 8" of travel is definitely a selling point. The real aircraft has 8.4".

Jon.

http://www.flightlink.com/base-page/jet-rudder-control-module




garys

  • Join date: Nov 2012
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Re: New Rudder Pedals
« Reply #1 on: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 23:02 »
Im not sure how up to date the flight link company is. I remember these rudder pedals when they were released over 10 years ago now.  I also see they are still advertising the epic interface system which I believe doesn't work with operating systems later than windows XP. I could be wrong of course, but I would definately try contacting them before making a solid decision.

Hardy Heinlin

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Re: New Rudder Pedals
« Reply #2 on: Thu, 11 Oct 2018 23:50 »
I got the same impression. On their website there is a list of retailer addresses, and the Simware and Intercraft addresses displayed are several years old and no longer valid.

emerydc8

  • Join date: Jun 2015
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Re: New Rudder Pedals
« Reply #3 on: Fri, 12 Oct 2018 00:22 »
I received a reply back within hours and they forwarded my inquiries to someone in the company who could answer my questions. They said they still sell the rudders. Awaiting a reply. Based on the 8" throw, these would actually be better than the FDS rudders for about half the price. One of the most useful features of PSX is its ability to simulate a real engine out at V1, unlike any other program I have seen. The problem is that most of the rudders available have a short throw and they don't come anywhere near simulating what a real V1 cut is like. In the real sim, when you have 4" of rudder in and you move it 1/4" either way, you will see a significant change in yaw, roll and pitch. This one maneuver is probably responsible for more than half the busts on the -400 at my company. If you hit a pod, go off the side of the runway, or crash, your ride is over.  And the V1 cut is almost always done with a 15-knot crosswind from the side of the failed engine, 500RVR, max landing weight, and max thrust (no de-rates).
« Last edit: Fri, 12 Oct 2018 00:36 by emerydc8 »

Britjet

  • Join date: Aug 2014
  • Location: Camberley, UK
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Re: New Rudder Pedals
« Reply #4 on: Fri, 12 Oct 2018 10:07 »
If you hit a pod, go off the side of the runway, or crash, your ride is over.  And the V1 cut is almost always done with a 15-knot crosswind from the side of the failed engine, 500RVR, max landing weight, and max thrust (no de-rates).

In Europe you will not be surprised to learn, Jon, that we take a more pragmatic approach. Cat 1 conditions with a defined cloudbase, usually 250 tonnes on 747, derated thrust and a realistic wind, without making it difficult. 15kts would be considered “unfair”.
I fail to see how they could deliberately give you a wind from the side of the failed engine - that would be like telling you which engine was going to fail!
‘Ride is over” is not a phrase that we would be familiar with. In my experience maybe 10% would have genuine difficulty with handling the engine fail - these pilots would be given further training (which would usually be in the same sim detail). Then a second attempt was allowed, and only if they failed this time, was the item recorded as a fail.

Peter.

emerydc8

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Re: New Rudder Pedals
« Reply #5 on: Fri, 12 Oct 2018 20:01 »
On the V1 cut, if you are astute enough to recognize the combination of conditions, at least you know what to expect. It's been a while since I was on the -400 so maybe they're mixing it up now. I don't know why, but our -400 sim has a pretty violent engine failure characteristic. There's a violent pop, the airplane yaws and it's as if the engine is going from full forward thrust to reverse instantaneously. Under the conditions described above (full power, crosswind, fairly light), it initially takes full rudder to keep it on the runway centerline. When I say the "ride is over," I mean the ride is over for the day (you get pink-slipped) and then the company will decide whether to give you additional training before you try it again.

I think our training department prides itself on having the highest OPT (Optimized Proficiency Training) rate in the industry. I've heard it's close to 20%, but they won't give the union the figures. So, anyone who gets an overall unsat on any validation, or needs 50% more training at any phase, gets invited back to sim every 6 months instead of every year. Once in the OPT program, they warn the first officers not to even think about upgrading because the chances of making it through are really slim-to-none and you might very well find yourself without a job afterwards.