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News:
Precision Simulator update 10.126 (12 September 2020) is now available.
Aerowinx NG FMC and More is now released.

Recent posts

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91
Accessories / Re: Crackling sound from PC to speakers via mixer
« Last post by Hardy Heinlin on Thu, 17 Sep 2020 21:25 »
It's competely distorted. I can't hear any voice.

It sounds like Ringo Starr is playing Back Off Boogaloo while the steam engines of the Titanic are performing an Irish Dance.
92
I just tried WidePSX with the new MSFS 2020 patch 1.8.3.0 (released yesterday) and everything still works as expected.

John
93
Accessories / Re: Crackling sound from PC to speakers via mixer
« Last post by GodAtum on Thu, 17 Sep 2020 20:41 »
There's a lot of USBs connected to it like yoke and FDS parts.

here's it taxing on the ground: https://www.dropbox.com/s/aucviow64v6b4cr/sim%20sound%202.m4a?dl=0

It sounds distorted at points.
94
Accessories / Re: Crackling sound from PC to speakers via mixer
« Last post by Hardy Heinlin on Thu, 17 Sep 2020 15:04 »
OK, this sounds like a ground problem. *

It may be a ground loop. You said, your NUC isn't grounded. So a ground loop is actually unlikely. However, if the NUC is connected to a second or third device besides your audio device, that other device may generate a ground loop (if it's grounded). What devices are connected to your NUC? And are they grounded?


* How does it sound when your PNF is reading the checklist? Is the voice distorted or normal? If it's distorted, it's not necessarily a significant ground loop but just an extremely loud output volume which amplifies the humming background noise as well due to the extreme amplification. You get such problems when you connect the speaker output of device A with the mic input of device B, for example.
95
Accessories / Re: Crackling sound from PC to speakers via mixer
« Last post by GodAtum on Thu, 17 Sep 2020 14:22 »
This is a sample of the sound, I turned up the volume to be able to record it clearer. Nothing else was playing.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/c8qkt1mn2t8nrbf/sim%20sound.m4a?dl=0

I tried a USB sound card but that seems to make no difference.
96
Hangar 7 / Re: Short / Low Res YT Channel, but worth watching...
« Last post by cdpohl on Thu, 17 Sep 2020 13:12 »
These lessons may be interesting to some, but, honestly, at my age this comes across to me as extremely dry, hence a waste to watch, since most of what is said is forgotten a half hour later.
97
Hangar 7 / Re: Where is the axis for Crab angle measurement located?
« Last post by vnangli on Thu, 17 Sep 2020 06:17 »

...if I stick a pin vertically through the aircraft from the ceiling down through the floor and into the ground, such that the aircraft pivots around this pin to create the crab in a crosswind landing, where in the aircraft is this pin located? It's the CG.


This is exactly what I was trying to ask....Thank you for the analogy, @Will..
98

Wow that's brilliant! Thanks very much Gary!  8)

Jermain,

Your wish is my command.  ACA is now added as an option.

https://prnt.sc/uik464

However AWS appear to have an outage preventing me from pushing the update to the live version, so the logo will be missing.  I will try again in the morning.

Cheers
Gary
99
Hangar 7 / Re: Where is the axis for Crab angle measurement located?
« Last post by Will on Thu, 17 Sep 2020 02:19 »
If I'm understanding your question correctly, the answer is the center of gravity (CG).

I think you're asking this: if I stick a pin vertically through the aircraft from the ceiling down through the floor and into the ground, such that the aircraft pivots around this pin to create the crab in a crosswind landing, where in the aircraft is this pin located? It's the CG.

But Hardy and the others are right that the actual angle between the heading and the track will be exactly the same at any point from the nose to the tail. Sticking with the pin analogy, if you pin the aircraft to the ground through the CG and measure a 15-degree crab angle there, then if you go to the nose of the aircraft and measure the difference between the heading and the track, the answer is still 15 degrees. And if you walk back to the tail and measure the angle between the heading and the track again, the answer is still 15 degrees.

But if the wind changes direction, the aircraft will pivot around the pin (i.e., the CG) to get a new heading in order to keep the same track.

(Keep in mind that the center of gravity here is Σ(d*w) for a bazillion combinations of distance times weight, and it's opposed by a similar collection of lift vectors, some positive and some negative. But the whole assembly pivots around that pin, which goes through the CG.)
100
Hangar 7 / Re: Where is the axis for Crab angle measurement located?
« Last post by Hardy Heinlin on Thu, 17 Sep 2020 00:16 »
The way I was understanding the Crab angle is the measure between the Longitudanal axis and the track.

In my comment I was using the word "longitudinal" in the context of navigational angles on a planetary sphere. You are using it in the context of roll, pitch, and yaw axes; the roll axis being the longitudinal axis. That's a different subject.

When referring to True North, the HDG is the angle between the aircraft's "fuselage line" (longitudinal axis, if you will) and the earth's longitude that the fuselage is crossing. Every longitude is a line going from the True South Pole to the True North Pole. The earth's longitude at the present position is your reference for your True North HDG. That's why it's called longitudinal heading. Whether you use the present longitude at the nose or that at the tail won't make a big difference on your instruments.

Likewise, as long as the track is constant, there won't be any notable difference between the longitudinal track of the nose and the longitudinal track of the tail. Both travel into the same direction.
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